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Good Oral Hygiene is Essential to Good Healing

Good Oral Hygiene is Essential to Good Healing

Southern West Virginia Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons wants you to heal as quickly as possible after dental implant surgery and good oral hygiene is essential to good healing. Dental implants are designed to provide a foundation for replacement teeth that look, feel, and function like natural teeth.

The implants themselves are tiny titanium posts that are surgically placed into the jawbone where teeth are missing. These metal anchors act as tooth root substitutes. The bone bonds with the titanium, creating a strong foundation for artificial teeth. Small posts that protrude through the gums are then attached to the implant. These posts provide stable anchors for artificial replacement teeth.

In order to heal quickly, follow the post-surgery instruction given to you and use all prescriptions that you are provided. Warm salt-water rinses should be used at least 4-5 times a day, as well, especially after meals. Brushing your teeth and the healing abutments is no problem. Be gentle initially with brushing the surgical areas.

 

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Don’t Prolong Getting Your Wisdom Teeth Removed

Don’t Prolong Getting Your Wisdom Teeth Removed

Although this surgery may seem daunting and leave you with an uneasy feeling when you think about it, don’t worry! I put off having my wisdom teeth out for as long as I could (which I don’t recommend because having them grow in is worse than you would think).  I was so nervous the day of surgery because I had never had anything more done at a doctor’s office than a physical. I had no idea what to expect. But the great part of Dr. Gilbert and his staff is that they put you at ease and tell you exactly what to expect and what is going to happen. There are no surprises. They full prepare you and make sure you are comfortable as possible.

This will definitely calm your nerves if you have them. My advice is to get it done as soon as possible when your dentist tells you that it is best to remove them. One of the reasons I was so nervous was because I waited years to get them out. But if I had gotten them removed later that month, I would have saved myself tons of worrying and because it really wasn’t as scary as I thought. Knowing that your doctor and his staff are fully competent and friendly is a big relief.

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Avoiding Dry Socket

Avoiding Dry Socket

At Southern West Virginia Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, we take great care to prepare patients for surgery and to provide useful aftercare instructions. One of our goals after tooth removal is to help you avoid the occurrence of a dry socket.

A dry socket, also know as alveolar osteitis, is a condition that sometimes occurs after a tooth is extracted. When the socket is slow to heal, the gums leave an area exposed and a dry socket may develop and can be very painful for three to five days.

Treatment for dry socket may include cleaning the site and placing a medicated dressing in the socket, which helps relieve pain. The dressing may need to be replaced daily until the pain diminishes and the socket begins to heal. Your dentist or prosthodontist may recommend an anti-inflammatory drug, such as aspirin and ibuprofen, or prescribe other pain relievers to manage the pain associated with dry socket.

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Frequently Asked Questions About Impacted Teeth

Frequently Asked Questions About Impacted Teeth

Written By Dr. Adonis Terezides

Wisdom Teeth and the upper canines are the most common impacted teeth. Treating impacted wisdom teeth is fairly simple and involves surgical removal of the entire tooth. When canines are impacted, the treatment is more complex as these teeth are vital to a healthy bite and good aesthetics.

Treatment of impacted canine teeth often involves cooperation with your orthodontist to make room for the canine, by shifting the teeth with braces, surgical exposure of the impacted tooth by the oral surgeon with placement of an orthodontic bracket to allow the orthodontist to guide the impacted tooth into place with orthodontic appliances.

When a tooth becomes stuck in the jawbone and either emerges only a small bit or does not break through the gums at all, it is said to be impacted. An impaction can cause a wide range of complications, including improperly aligned bite, pain and infection. The following are the most frequently asked questions about impacted teeth.

  • What causes teeth to become impacted?  Impacted teeth occur when full tooth eruption does not take place. This condition can occur because a person’s jaw is too small to accommodate the teeth; if the existing teeth are not in the right position, preventing the normal eruption of the impacted tooth; if the impacted teeth are growing in at an abnormal angle; or if there is a benign cyst or tumor, a retained baby tooth that fuses to the bone preventing the permanent tooth from erupting, or overlying soft tissues preventing the eruption.
  • Which teeth most commonly experience impactions? The wisdom teeth most commonly become impacted as they emerge in the back of the mouth long after all of the other teeth have erupted. The maxillary canines, also called cuspids or eye teeth, are the second most common teeth to experience impactions.
  • What symptoms are present with impacted teeth? Neither impacted canines nor wisdom teeth are likely to produce any symptoms at all. Typically, these are discovered by your dentist or your orthodontist when they take x-rays. Later in life, when a wisdom tooth (third molar) does not erupt properly, it can cause jaw and gum pain in the back of the jaw, caused by an infection of the gums called periocoronitis, and difficulty opening the mouth or chewing. You see, when there is not enough room for wisdom teeth to full erupt, they come partly through the gum tissue. Wisdom teeth, like all teeth, have an enamel covering. Enamel is very hard, and very slick. Gum tissue will not “stick” to enamel, so a gum flap results. When you chew, food gets pushed under the gum flap and accumulates, causing potential for infection – called pericoronitis. When it occurs in the lower jaw, the infection can progress through the tissues of the mouth to the neck, potentially causing a life threatening infection.
  • How are impacted wisdom teeth treated? Because impacted wisdom teeth can cause damage to surrounding teeth and are not functional, surgical removal of third molars is the treatment of choice. The oral surgeon creates an opening in the gums and the bone, he typically sections the tooth to allowed reduced trauma to the jaw, he removes the tooth and its roots and closes the incision with sutures. This is one of the most commonly performed procedures in the field of oral surgery.
  • How are impacted canines treated? Unlike impacted wisdom teeth, canines are critical for a properly aligned bite and good cosmetic appearance. Canine teeth are often called the “the cornerstone of the occlusion”, so your oral surgeon will work together with your orthodontist to help assist the eruption of these teeth. If caught early enough, sometimes by orthodontically creating enough space for the tooth to erupt on its own, surgery can be avoided.  If the tooth does not erupts on its own, the oral surgeon can make an incision into the gums to expose the impacted tooth, attach an orthodontic bracket and the orthodontist will guide that tooth downward and into its proper position.
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Signs and Symptoms That Wisdom Teeth Need To Be Removed

Written by Dr. Adonia Terezides

It’s time for a consultation to discuss wisdom tooth removal if your teenager is experiencing any of the following:

  • Pain or jaw stiffness near an impacted tooth (one that is either stuck under the gum or only able to partially break through the gum)
  • Pain or irritation from a wisdom tooth coming in at an awkward angle and pressing against the nearby tooth or rubbing against the cheek, tongue or top or bottom of the mouth.
  • A swelling or infection in the flap of the gum tissue that covers an impacted wisdom tooth that has only partially broken through the gum
  • Teeth are becoming more crowded
  • Development of tooth decay or gum disease because there isn’t enough room to properly care for the wisdom tooth and surrounding teeth
  • Trapping of food under the flap of gum tissue covering a partially erupted wisdom tooth

If your teen is having any of these symptoms, call us today!

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When Should Wisdom Teeth Be Removed

When Should Wisdom Teeth Be Removed

Written by Dr. Adonis Terezides

Learn the Signs and Symptoms Indicating Your Teen Needs to Have His or Her Wisdom Teeth Removed

If your teenagers are like more than 80% of Americans, chances are that they will eventually develop problems with their wisdom teeth.

Wisdom teeth are the upper and lower third molars located at the very back of our mouths, which are the last to develop, and are unlikely to grow into a functional and comfortable position, thereby causing problems from crowding/shifting of the other teeth to creating painful, inflamed, and, often infected, flaps of gum tissue.

The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons typically recommends pre-emptive wisdom teeth removal during the mid/late teen years to young adulthood, before symptoms and problems arise. With pre-emptive wisdom tooth removal by an oral surgeon, especially during the teenage years before wisdom tooth root development is complete, much of the postoperative pain and discomfort can be minimized or completely avoided.

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